Oooh- perty! Sexy! Pushing Her Bounderies.

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My sexy contemp. Go buy it. Seriously. This is both fun and sexy. Loved re-writing!

Registered nurse Maggie is done with men. Flying to Minneapolis to celebrate her sister’s engagement, she’s seated beside the type of man she always falls for. A sexy, arrogant alpha jerk.

Dr. Mace Williams irritates the woman next to him. She’s so damn sexy, he doesn’t care. When their seatmate suffers a cardiac arrest, Maggie and Mace team up to save his life, but despite their stellar teamwork it’s too late. Mace makes an unscheduled stop to meet with the man’s family while Maggie continues her journey.

In Minneapolis, Maggie heads to a restaurant with her sister, only to find Mace waiting. Worse, she learns he’s the brother of her sister’s fiance. But still, he is a sexy beast. Stuck in her sister’s apartment with Mace, Maggie offers him one night of sex, anything goes. No obligations, no recriminations.

Mace agrees…he wants more than Maggie’s body, he wants her heart.

Thrown into a disastrous canoe trip, they must once again work together, but this time it’s their own survival at stake. Maggie must face her demons and trust Mace with her life. Mace is determined to save her, regardless of what the future brings.

Links:

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Prose has a beginning– Expository Writing.

When I first began to write… I don’t mean write but I mean move in the direction of prose as opposed to poetry and I wanted to shift my work from nothing more than a personal narrative to the wider world, I began with Expository Writing.

Expository Writing:

A term for any form of writing that conveys information and explains ideas.

As one of the four traditional modes of discourse, expository writing may include elements of narration, description and argumentation, but unlike creative writing or persuasive writing, its primary goal is to deliver information about an issue, subject, method, or idea.

In other words– Just the facts, ma’am. Expository writing helps you cut the fluff. It is a practice that teaches you how to say what you need to say in as few words as possible while still imbuing those words with meaning and yes, even pathos.

As my favorite writing teacher frequently repeated: “Why use a fifty dollar word when a fifty cent word will do?”

To put it simply, he was right. (Write?)

If there is one thing I would advise any would-be or hopeful writer to do it is to take an Expository Writing class. Look online, check out a local community college, a writers conference. See what’s available.

Expository writing is the first step to concise gripping resounding prose.

The Four Steps: Read, Watch, Listen, Body Language.

Are you aware that your dog communicates with body language? Most dogs cannot talk, aside from those dogs you occasionally see on youtube saying… “I wuv you.”

Well, I guess I can’t generalize about the entire animal kingdom… Our birds can talk. Cats can kinda talk.

We did have a cat who could speak English– Norman. He could say “Moror”, which is the bitter herb we eat at Passover, and “Myrywn”, a word similar to my husband ‘Oscar’s’ real name.

Oh yeah, his sister, Nolan, once said, “I dunno,” when asked, “Where’s your brother?”

Their mother could speak as well.  We all heard her. One night we were in bed, but the cat and her four kittens were down in the living room and the kittens were running around like they were on a nascar track. A strange woman yelled out, “Stop it!” And they did. There was dead silence. We all came out of our bedrooms and looked at each other. It was kind of stunning. The only creatures downstairs were Kitty and her kittens. We looked down at them. They looked up at us. But the kittens quit their running and went to bed.

All of which is to say… Sometimes what people don’t say means more than what they do say. Learning to understand body language is important if you want to understand people.

Dogs get it. Most animals get it because although animals can bark, growl, purr, snort, whatever, it’s their body that speaks for them. A good writer pays attention to body language in order to understand what someone is actually saying.

Does a person make eye contact? Or is a lack of eye contact cultural? Does a person lean toward me or away from me?

How much personal space do I need? How much does he need? Or she need?

What’s up with those hand gestures? How does an aggressive person appear and why/how does my body instinctively react to aggression? How does a person act when afraid? Sad? Weary? Confused? Happy?

Does that smile go all the way to the eyes? Or is the smile merely a politeness or, worse, a phony smile?

If you can learn to read a person’s body language, you will get more truth than you will from words alone.

Watch dogs. Dogs are masters at reading body language. My dog can tell if someone is fearful or aggressive or friendly from three hundred yards away, even farther.

Understanding body language will help you create fleshed-out, well-rounded characters. You don’t have to include, i.e., write down every nuance, every movement in your story; rather, it’s your understanding of body language that will make your characters real to your readers. Not cardboard or paper people (Guardians of the Galaxy), but real. Your insight will help you build real three dimensional people on that flat page.

Picture it as a pop-up book. That’s your goal. Characters who pop right off the page. We don’t want no ciphers. No. No. No.

I learned a valuable lesson from the Twilight series. Bear with me. I discovered the secret of Edward’s appeal to teens and young adults. He was one-dimensional, nothing more than a blank wall. The beauty of a blank wall is that each reader could throw against it whatever he or she wanted and it stuck. In other words, each reader could read into Edward what he or she wanted, make him over into her fantasy. Which is one of the reasons Twilight fanfic has been so popular. There’s no original there there. Sorry. Don’t mean to offend Twilight fans, but that’s my take on it.

The problem with a blank wall is that ultimately, it is unsatisfying– which, of course, is why we try to color it in. A real 3-D character is more like Jamie Fraser from Outlander. One might fantasize about Jamie, but one cannot improve upon Jamie. He IS. He has being.

Study up on your body language. It is the key to creating three dimensional characters.

In the beginning…

there were books. Therefore books are where I’ll begin my tale.

Books shape the soul of a writer.

It is a need embedded deep in the human psyche– to record our stories, our lives. To communicate to future generations.

The pen (and the cave painting) is a long arm from the grave.

But I will not tell the story today. Sorry, distracted and busy, preparing for a trip.

April 13th is my birthday. I like to be away for my birthday.

I’ll begin sometime next week. Julia

There is a method to my madness.

(Right now I’m in first place in the Barrett Family Bracket but I have everything riding on Michigan State. Go Spartans! OMG this game is intense. Overtime!!!)

So this is a brand spanking new space. It will be about my books and my methods. I will discus my past, present and future and how each moment in my time relates to my writing~ i.e.~ my voice, my themes, my characters, my narrative, my style.

From time to time I may interrupt to inform you about WIPs, price changes, new releases, new covers, etc. Information about all my books is on my sidebar to the left. (All the links you will ever need!)

If you want to hear about All Things Jake and maybe a few stories about the crazy hubster, visit:  I Don’t Think It Means What You Think It Means.

For general information on my books, my archived blog posts, recipes and about me, my old website is still available for your perusal. I’ll update the site from time to time. Julia Barrett’s World.

Hey all, it’s good to be back. Love y’all. Julia